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Malcolm Goodwin Talking About CW’s New Show iZombie

Malcolm Goodwin Talks About CW’s New Show iZombie

They say that vampires and zombies will never die in America, these two genres are just too popular. Did you grow up enjoy watching zombie movies and tv shows? (after you became old enough)

No, I didn’t really enjoy zombies. I’ve always been scared of them. But iZombie is different, it’s a lovely one. I mean who’s going to be scared of Rose Mclver?

There are so many different zombie products out there, there’s The

Walking Dead tv series, the Plants vs. Zombies game, and there’s Jeffrey Tambor and Lindsay Lohan without makeup… why do you think iZombie is different?

Well this is not a horror TV show. Even though it’s about zombies, it has a lot of cute storylines in it. The writers just wote it really well. Liv is really not a simple dead zombie.

Right, I remember going to comic con and seeing the iZombie poster on bags, it’s Liv eating a brain like if she’s eating ramen, what do you think about this poster? What kind of idea are they trying to convey?

Oh, Liv eats brain, and she has to be fed with human brains to stay alive. When she eats brain, she gets information from that person. Yeah when they were taking that picture, it was really gross, she really had to eat that stuff. I think now they have made it more delicious.  Speaking of which, Rose works so hard. Due to her makeup, she has to show up on set 2 hours early along with the makeup team, to do her hair, her makeup, and skin tone. And when we are done, she has to stay afterwards to take off the make up. It’s a lot of work for her.

Okay so Liv is a zombie, she has to be fed with human brains to stay alive. But you, as a detective, believe that she’s really just a goth chick that has psychic powers? What’s wrong with you? Do you have a crush on her?

Haha yes I might, I might! I only think she’s a chick with psychic powers. After she ate a brain, she was able to help me connect with that person’s old memories. So you know, I kinda hide it. I tell people that she only has psychic powers.

When are you going to find out that Liv is a zombie?

That I’m not sure! Even if I do I might just keep it a secret. She helps me a lot you know.

And there’s also a NEW “IZOMBIE” POSTER that SHOWCASES LIV, CLIVE AND DR. CHAKRABARTI,  does this mean that you three are the most important characters?

Yes, I would say so. Dr. Chakrabarti is the only person who knows that Liv is a zombie. She would go to him and he gradually makes her feel more alive. Then Liv realizes that she can actually feel, like a human. So she wants to work with Dr. Charkrabarti to become more alive. You will find it fascinating to watch how a zombie starts to feel emotions and wants to become human again.

 

iZombie is coming out in 2015. Why would you think it’s going to be popular other than it’s about zombie?

I think it’s going to be great. DC comic books have had so many different stories; this one is going to be different. The show is so lovely, everyone is going to love it.

One of the best things at work: running into your fellow journalism classmate. Shout out to the professional and gorgeous @ashluckyyy #Trojans #usc @uscannenberg

One of the best things at work: running into your fellow journalism classmate. Shout out to the professional and gorgeous @ashluckyyy #Trojans #usc @uscannenberg

Mark Cuban and his Cyber Dust

 

“We all have risks,” Mr. Marc Cuban said, “such as people reading your messages with loss of context years later.” Cyber Dust is “an innovative app that facilitates private communication,” .

Created by Marc Cuban, entrepreneur, the app is now expanding beyond the U.S., “We’re about to launch Cyber Dust in China.” The app will take on SnapChat, which is popular in that region of the world and in the United States. Snapchat is the closest competition to the vanishing messaging functionality that Cyber Dust has.

In the hot and heavy realm of business deals and young start-ups, “businesses survive on secrets,” he said, adding “It fulfills an important role. “If you are a young entrepreneur, you are talking about your secretive business idea with your partner, you don’t want that information to leak!”

“Cyber Dust is for everyone,” he said, when talking about its uses beyond celebrities and business people.  “If you are sending a picture to your boyfriend, you don’t want others to see it, use Cyber Dust.” Mr. Cuban said. 

“Nowadays people need privacy, which is the reason why Cyber Dust was invented.” When asked if this product plays to only a niche market, Mr. Cuban replied, “This is where the mobile future is going.”

Brad Ehlert

The woeful purples and deep, tired lines represent a man who has been through it all. The bright, inquisitive eyes showcase a perpetually defiant and curious spirit. The colorful interlocking tiles behind the figure signify a puzzle-esque worldview - for all of the interesting, unique, and exciting experiences that this world offers, in the end the individual standalone instances are all perfectly matching pieces to the greater whole that is the human experience. So Brad Ehlert, author, businessman, journalist, and father, describes the cover of his new book: Cole.

Brad Ehlert is the Senior Vice President of Client Solutions at Trade Press Media Group; a Wisconsin based cross-platform advertising and marketing firm serving the automotive, rail, and construction industries’ service providers. Holding a degree in Journalism from the University of Wisconsin Madison, Mr. Ehlert has worked throughout the United States, putting the skills behind his bachelor’s degree to the test in the journalism (and eventually business) world. He is a living, breathing, and hard working example of the versatility that journalists can achieve in their careers.

At 56 years old, Mr. Ehlert has yet to slow down. “Everyday is challenging and no two days are the same,” says the business executive. “Critical thinking, problem solving, working with highly talented and motivated people are things I really enjoy.  Also, we hold the #1 position in the market segments we compete in. Winning ongoing battles against direct and indirect competitors is very satisfying.”

But, even given all of the great benefits, Ehlert doesn’t consider his job perfect.

“You can’t win them all.  Sometimes we get beat and it’s not fun. Also, the continual grind year after year to “make the numbers” can be exhausting—especially during down business cycles. It’s also not fun having to fire non-performers. After 31 years, I’d say the cons only represent about 10% of my career experience.”

Mr. Ehlert is what many would call a self-made man. His father, an ad-man, was paid on strict commission during Ehlert’s youth in the 1960s and 70s. There was constant anxiety in the household that sales would not pan out and bills would not be paid. The family moved from house to house, eventually settling in the city of Pewaukee, about twenty miles west of Milwaukee, where Ehlert attended high school. After paying himself through Wisconsin’s top public university, Ehlert graduated with a degree in journalism, a personal commitment to never fall victim to commission and dream of the Pacific Ocean. Hopping into his red thunderbird and heading for San Diego to find work, Mr. Ehlert embarked on what he considers his first of countless business trips. These business trips, which have ranged from Tijuana as a journalist to Montreal more recently as Senior VP, are considered by Ehlert to be a valuable addition to his working life. He says “travel expands your horizons by broadening your experiences, introducing you to new places, people, cultures, sights, sounds, flavors, etc. It also breaks up the routine. I don’t think I would enjoy a career that only involved driving back and forth to the office every day.”

 

It’s this same desire dislike of routine that has compelled Ehlert to step beyond the bounds of executive-hood and become a writer. “I’ve seen so much in my short time on this planet, and I feel like I’ve really developed a strong sense of how this world works. When I say that, I don’t mean universal truths, I just mean from my own perspective I have a system of dealing with experiences as they come that allows me to make the most sense of them. That’s what I wanted to showcase with my new book, Cole. My view of the world.”

His book touches on many different facets of his human experience, including lessons and observations from his time as a journalist, his interpersonal relationships with his wife and children, his transition from journalism to a successful businessman, and his newfound role as an author.

“One of the biggest lessons that this world has taught me is to put your family first,” says Ehlert. “This is a common theme in my writing. A career is one thing. Money is one thing. You need them, but you can get them so many ways in so many different situations. A family is irreplaceable, and a family is what makes life worth living. Never put money or career over that, but do strike a good enough balance so that you are your loving family are not eating on the streets.”

When it is time to handle your career, though, Ehlert encourages young students to keep some things in mind when pursuing a life with media. “Be flexible, keep learning, expect change, embrace change, go with the flow and enjoy the ride!”

With the handsome and talented @mackenzie_sol at the #carouselofhope #redcarpet  (at The Beverly Hilton)

With the handsome and talented @mackenzie_sol at the #carouselofhope #redcarpet (at The Beverly Hilton)

I really love Mark Cuban’s app #cyberdust , it’s amazing and private . My username is Cocaxie, let’s make chatting more fun! @mcuban

I really love Mark Cuban’s app #cyberdust , it’s amazing and private . My username is Cocaxie, let’s make chatting more fun! @mcuban

Interviewing Malcolm Goodwin on Friday, for CW’s new show iZombie.

Interviewing Malcolm Goodwin on Friday, for CW’s new show iZombie.

Harvey Levin, founder of #TMZ at #usc . He conveyed 2 ideas during his speech: 1. TV is dying in 5 years. 2. Buying videos and photos is different from buying information, it’s journalistically ethical and every outlet does that.

Harvey Levin, founder of #TMZ at #usc . He conveyed 2 ideas during his speech: 1. TV is dying in 5 years. 2. Buying videos and photos is different from buying information, it’s journalistically ethical and every outlet does that.

Brad Ehlert Q&A

My guest today is Brad Ehlert, the Senior Vice President of Client Solutions at Trade Press Media Group; a Wisconsin based cross-platform advertising and marketing firm serving the automotive, rail, and construction industries’ service providers. Holding a degree in Journalism from the University of Wisconsin Madison, Mr. Ehlert has worked throughout the United States, putting the skills behind his bachelor’s degree to the test in the journalism (and eventually business) world. He is a living, breathing, and hard working example of the versatility that journalists can achieve in their careers.

Mr. Ehlert is what many would call a self-made man. His father, a fellow ad-man, was paid on strict commission during Brad’s youth in the 1960s and 70s. There was constant anxiety in the household that sales would not pan out and bills would not be paid. The family moved from house to house, eventually settling in the city of Pewaukee, about twenty miles west of Milwaukee, where Brad attended high school. After paying himself through Wisconsin’s top public university, Brad graduated with a degree in journalism, a personal commitment to never fall victim to commission, and dreams of the Pacific Ocean.

Hopping into his red Thunderbird, Brad struck a course to San Diego, California straight out of school to pursue a career in journalism. His path since has taken many twists and turns, from one industry to the next, following the passion inside and the all-mighty dollars promised in the latest contact. Spanning three major recessions, the invention of the Internet and World Wide Web, seven US Presidents, and more than a few wars, Mr. Ehlert’s career has seen it all. At age 56, the father of two has not slowed down a bit, with a recent promotion placing him in charge of the majority of the company’s operations.

You have more than 30 years of experience at Trade Price Media Group. Can you briefly tell me about your business-media executive job?

As Senior VP of Client Solutions my responsibility is to develop the team and strategies that will allow us to reach our revenue goals.  Trade Press Media Group is a $16 million business to business media company

Other than getting to travel a lot, what are the things you like about being a business-media executive?

Everyday is challenging and no two days are the same. Critical thinking, problem solving, working with highly talented and motivated people are things I really enjoy.  Also, we hold the #1 position in the market segments we compete in. Winning ongoing battles against direct and indirect competitors is very satisfying.

How about the cons?

You can’t win them all. Sometimes we get beat and it’s not fun. Also, the continual grind year after year to “make the numbers” can be exhausting—especially during down business cycles. It’s also not fun having to firing non-performers. After 31 years, I’d say the cons only represent about 10% of my career experience.

That’s great. I would like to learn more about your recently published book Cole.

It’s my second short (very short!) novel. It was an attempt to express a specific worldview through stream of consciousness—an artistic endeavor that will hopefully be interesting to the few people who’ll ever read it. 

What do you think traveling brings people?

At airports, usually headaches ☺ Air travel (as you know) can be quite a grind these days. On the positive side, travel expands your horizons by broadening your experiences, introducing you to new places, people, cultures, sights, sounds, flavors, etc. It also breaks up the routine. I don’t think I would enjoy a career that only involved driving back and forth to the office every day.

When and why did you decide to become an author?

I don’t consider myself to be a real author. I’m a writer. I’ve written the two short books, but I’ve written thousands of pages of persuasive business communications during my career.

How was it like to be a journalist back in 1980s? What are the biggest differences between journalists in nowadays and back then?

I was only a journalist for a few years after college. I worked for a weekly newspaper in Wisconsin and a daily in California. It was a long time ago and I don’t remember a lot of details, but I covered high-school sports, local government meetings, business news and wrote a column about community retailers. We wrote our articles on type writers and did all the prepress work ourselves.

Do you consider yourself out of the journalism world now? Why?

Not out of the journalism world. However, I’m not on the content side of the business. I’m on the revenue-generating side of the business.

 

When and why did you quit the job as a journalist?

1983. I got offered more money to sell advertising than I was making as a journalist.

You got your bachelor’s degree in Journalism from University of Wisconsin, Madison. Was it a major that you had passion for since childhood?

Not childhood. I became very interested in journalism during the Watergate era. I saw the movie All the President’s men in 1976 when I was a junior in high school. That movie, plus the fact that my 7th grade teacher told me I was a good writer, set me on a course for a journalism degree.

How did you like the education in your university?

It was an excellent experience. Very good professors, a challenging school and a multi-cultural environment.

 

What kind of jobs do you think journalism majors are qualified for in nowadays?

Traditional print and broadcast positions, but also book editors, copywriters, website content producers; grant writers, newsletter writers, public relations specialists, technical writers, marketing communications specialists, bloggers and a myriad of other positions that call for great writing and communications skills.

What would you say in one sentence to the students who want to work in the media industry in the future?

Be flexible, keep learning, expect change, embrace change, go with the flow and enjoy the ride!

 

 

 

#photoshoot #makeup #Autoworld #model

#photoshoot #makeup #Autoworld #model